Catherine Cuddy | Framingham Real Estate, Malborough Real Estate, Southborough Real Estate


Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

They just don't make furniture like they used to. But even well-made drawers can break from time to time. And when they do, the best thing you can do is fix the drawer joint quickly rather than tugging on a loose panel, causing warping damage.

Here's the simplest way to get that drawer working properly.

What you'll need

  • Wood glue or epoxy
  • Drywall knife or box cutter
  • Drill (optional)
  • Eye protection
  • Rag
  • Furniture pegs
  • Hammer
  • Rubber mallet
  • Two corner braces (optional) with eight screws 
  • Screwdriver
  • Step One: Determine the Joint Type

    The best-made furniture has a dovetail joint. This is a triangle-shaped interlocking piece of wood that connects the sides of the drawer together as well as the front panel. Pieces slide together like a puzzle.

    In economically-priced furniture, the drawer is secured together with wooden pegs and wood glue. This kind is much more likely to give you problems. Each time you slam it shut, those pegs jostle lose slightly until you have a gap.  The solutions below will help you repair 

    Step Two: Take the Drawer Apart

    Remove any part of the drawer that isn't fully connected. For example, the face of the drawer may be loose while the back joints are intact. Don't undo what's still working. Pegs may fit firmly in one side of the wood. You don't have to remove them unless they're loose. 

    Now, you're ready to take one of the two approaches.

    Step Three A: Clear the Surface & Re-glue the Pieces

    Very carefully use the drywall knife to peel away any glue on the surfaces. Place a strip of glue across the surface where two pieces come together. Wood glue works well. But epoxy is even better.

    Then re-insert pegs on the opposite side, hammering down half-way if needed. Press the wood together firmly until flush. Hold together while wiping away any glue that squeezes out. *Pro tip* Use the rubber mallet to hammer the two pieces together if the pegs won't go in completely. This won't damage the wood.

    If the furniture has broken dovetails, you need to get creative. Drill two to four holes slightly smaller than furniture pegs. Insert new pegs. And then complete step three.

    Step Three B: Reinforce Corners with Braces

    If the drawer is in a high traffic area, you might need to strengthen the drawer. So alternatively, place corner braces inside the drawer. After taking the drawer apart, position the braces in the inside of the drawer and use a pencil to mark where to drill. Drill holes for the braces and screw them in.

    And that's how to fix a broken drawer joint. For more fun DIY home fixes, follow our blog.


    Your thirties are a time of many important financial decisions. Many people are starting families, buying homes, and getting settled into their careers by the time they turn thirty. The following ten years are often marked by salary increases, moving into larger homes, and saving for retirement.

    It’s vital to have a solid grasp on personal finance in your thirties, as it is in many ways the foundation of your finances for the decades to come. So, in this article we’re going to give you some advice on buying a home and managing your money in your thirties.

    Straighten out your credit

    If your twenties were a volatile time of incurring debts from student loans, car loans, and other expenses, then it’s paramount to get your credit in order in your early thirties. Having a high credit score can secure you lower interest rates on a home loan or let you refinance your loans at lower rates.

    Start by making sure your bills are on auto-pay, and be sure to settle any older debts from your younger years. You can also use a credit card for recurring expenses, such as gas to get to work or groceries, and then pay them off in full each month. This way, you’ll build credit and avoid accruing  interest at the same time.

    Reevaluate your lifestyle and long term goals

    A lot can change from the time you turn 25 to the time you turn 35. Your goals might shift from finding a home near the ocean to finding a home near a good school district for your children. You might also have the shocking realization that your children will be heading to college sooner than it might seem, and that you’re still working on paying off your own student debt.

    Consider things like the size house you’ll need for your family, where you want to live and whether that involves being close to aging parents, and reallocating money depending on your retirement goals.

    Rethink your insurance coverage

    Gone are the days when all you needed was a car insurance policy to get by. As you age and your responsibilities grow, you’ll need to think about the future for you and your family. That may include a more comprehensive health insurance plan for your family, a life insurance policy for yourself, or increased covered for home and auto insurance.

    Automate the headaches away

    With all of these growing responsibilities, it can be easy to get frustrated with the time you’re losing to keeping your finance in order. Fortunately, there are many tools at your disposal in the internet age that will make all of those responsibilities an afterthought.

    First, get a budget planning app, like Mint or You Need a Budget (YNAB). Next, set up your bills to auto-pay if you haven’t yet. Then, put reminders in your phone to periodically check your credit score and reassess whether you need to pay for certain monthly services (do you still watch Hulu?). Finally, if you haven’t yet, make sure you have your paychecks direct deposited into the accounts you’d like them to enter so you don’t have to worry about them.


    Photo by Media Design and Media Publishing via Pixabay

    Dark colors can be striking in any home, but too many darks can make your home seem gloomy and depressing. Fortunately, simple changes and choices can help you create a space with a dark palette that is attention-getting, not depressing.

    Lighting Matters

    Lighting at various levels matters for any space; the right setup of lights from above, on tabletops and even as accents for artwork visually brightens and expands a space. This effect is even more important when you have a darker wall color and furnishings. Make sure your room has adequate light and your space will look cozy, not grim and overly dark.

    Go for the Gloss

    When it comes to paint for your walls, doors and trim, you have several options ranging from flat, matte finishes to shiny, glossy surfaces. Choose glossy finishes to make your walls and trim pop, even in a dark room. Flat paint will absorb light and look dull, but glossy finishes will reflect light and brighten up your space. Use satin and semi-gloss on walls and accessories, and high gloss on trim for best results.

    Soften with Textiles

    Dark spaces can lose their impact if everything blends together. Incorporate some texture and color using throws, pillows and other textiles. These items can pull your space together, offer some contrast and ensure your room is striking, not gloomy, too.

    Choose Dark, not Black

    Navy, deep eggplant and burnt umber are all dark shades that still have interest and color; use one of these rich shades instead of black for your walls and furnishings. You’ll get the striking results you want without the Halloween-like appearance.

    Use Mirrors to Reflect Light

    Mirrors help bounce natural light from your windows around the room and liven up the space. Mirrors or reflective metallic surfaces help add highlights and interest to your space and make it more visually appealing.

    Use Colorful Artwork

    Dark doesn’t mean colorless or boring. Choose bold artwork and showcase it on your darker walls. You’ll not only highlight your favorite pieces, you’ll get a look worthy of an art gallery, right in your home.

    Use a Variety of Shades

    Dark furniture against a dark wall on top of a dark rug will look flat and boring. Opt for a palette of colors that work well together instead of a single, unified shade. You'll create a more interesting space and avoid a gloomy, foreboding look, too. 

    Used correctly, dark colors can have a striking impact on any space and allow you to create a room that is uniquely yours -- use one or more of the ideas above to incorporate darker shades the right way and you'll end up with a look  you'll love. 


    Image by Mark Dixon from Pixabay

    Maybe it's time to get your garden ready, or maybe you already have a few scraggly plants that need some support; but pre-made trellises can be both pricey and flimsey.  Instead of spending a lot to get a product that will fall apart after one, wet spring, why not make this sturdy trellis that can be used for years to come?  If you follow these plans, your final trellis will be 4' 8" tall and 3' 7" wide, fitting well into a four-foot, raised bed and will cost less than $15 to make.  

    Read on to learn how to make this inexpensive and environmentally-friendly trellis for your garden!

    Materials:

    • Five, 1" x 2" x 8' boards
    • Small screws and nails
    • Four braces
    • Stakes made of rot-resistant wood, found at garden supply stores.  Redwood, cedar, cypress, hemlock or juniper stakes are good choices.
    • 100% cotton thread/yarn, 8 ply or similar

    Directions:

    1. Cut four, 1" x 2" x 8' boards, dividing them into 3' 4" and 4' 8" pieces.  Cut the remaining 1" x 2" x 8' board into four equal pieces, each 2' in length.
    2. Set up on blocks or 2x4s and screw the 3' 4" and 4' 8" pieces together to make a rectangular frame, pre-drilling holes to prevent splitting.
    3. Attach braces at all four corners.  To make a brace, you will need to cut a small piece of wood that will fit into all four corners.  To learn how to cut off square, check out this short instructional video here, or you can purchase four, pre-made braces.
    4. Drill pilot holes to attach the redwood stakes to the bottom of the trellis and screw together with significant overlap but enough to allow the stake to stick out approximately 6" below the trellis.  
    5. Drive small nails into the trellis frame at 6" intervals such that approximately 1/3" still sticks out of the wood.  Omit nails at the four corners.
    6. Tie the thread to the lowest nail on your frame and extend to its companion nail on the other side.  Pull the thread upwards to the next nail on the same side of the frame, then extend across the frame again.  Continue with this pattern until you have thread extended horizontally all the way up your trellis.
    7. When you reach the top, extend your thread from the last nail along the sides to the first nail at the top of the trellis, such that your thread lines up to the brace.  Repeat the process again, pulling the thread vertically this time.  At the end of the process, you should have a 6" x 6" grid throughout your trellis.
    8. Repeat steps 1-8 to create a second, identical trellis.
    9. Take your first trellis and place it in its intended location.  Then, gently hammer at the top so that the stakes are driven into the dirt.  Take your next trellis and measure two feet away from your first.  Hammer it in as previous.
    10. Drill pilot holes and attach the trellis frames together with one of your 2' pieces of wood near the top of the trellis.  Repeat on the opposite side.  If desired, attach the trellis frames together a second time, 2' lower on your frame, using your remaining two, 2' pieces of wood.
    11. Weave any existing plants into the structure of your trellis.
    12. When growing season is over, simply cut the string away from the frame and compost the 100% cotton string and plants together!  You can unscrew the 2' pieces to lay your trellis flat for winter storage or keep it in place in your garden for next year.

    Framed photographs have helped transform your ordinary house into a comfortable home. However, if you recently bought or sold a home, you may need to pack up these photographs and take them to a new address in the near future.

    Lucky for you, we're here to provide expert insights into how to safely and quickly pack your framed photographs prior to moving day.

    Now, let's take a look at three best practice for packing framed photographs.

    1. Choose the Right Packing Material

    The right packing material for a framed photograph usually varies based on the size of the photograph itself.

    For example, if you're packing a small framed photograph, you may want to use a small moving box. Pack the box with bubble wrap or packing paper as well to fully secure the photograph during transit.

    If you need to move large framed photographs, you may want to pick up specialty boxes. These boxes can be purchased from a moving supply store and will make it easy for you to protect your photographs as they go from Point A to Point B.

    2. Wrap the Picture and Frame

    When it comes to protecting framed photographs, packing paper is ideal. If you wrap the photograph with the frame glass-side down against the paper, you can reduce the risk of damage.

    For those who decide to pack multiple small framed photographs in the same box, it often pays to individually wrap each photograph in packing paper. That way, you can keep various framed photographs together and prevent them from getting damaged.

    Also, use packing tape all the way around a photograph frame. This will help you keep all packing paper in place around the frame and photograph.

    3. Use Caution When Placing Framed Photographs in a Moving Truck

    A framed photograph will absorb pressure more easily on its edge than lying flat. Thus, a framed photograph should be placed on its side – not flat – in a moving truck.

    Furthermore, when you pack a moving truck, you should always place framed photographs in a spot where they won't move or fall over. You may even be able to wedge framed photographs between heavy objects to keep these photographs in place in a moving truck.

    If you need additional assistance as you pack your framed photographs or other belongings, you may want to hire a professional moving company. With this business at your side, you can receive comprehensive support as you prep for moving day.

    Lastly, a real estate agent can help you enjoy a seamless transition from one address to another. In addition to helping you map out the home selling or homebuying journey, a real estate agent can put you in touch with the best moving companies in your area.

    Simplify the process of packing your framed photographs – use the aforementioned best practices, and you can quickly and effortlessly get your framed photographs ready for an upcoming move.




    Loading